Man’s Pants Drop During Street Fight & A Dog Seizes His Opportune Moment.

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A wild street fight was caught on video in a public courtyard in Ireland. During the fight, one of the fighter’s pants begin to fall down and someone’s dog decides to take this opportunity to get laid and goes viral.

   

VIDEO AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PAGE:

The domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris or Canis familiaris)[4] is a member of the genus Canis (canines), which forms part of the wolf-like canids,[5] and is the most widely abundant terrestrial carnivore. The dog and the extant gray wolf are sister taxa as modern wolves are not closely related to the wolves that were first domesticated,[12][13] which implies that the direct ancestor of the dog is extinct.[14] The dog was the first species to be domesticated and has been selectively bred over millennia for various behaviors, sensory capabilities, and physical attributes.

Their long association with humans has led dogs to be uniquely attuned to human behavior[17] and they are able to thrive on a starch-rich diet that would be inadequate for other canid species.[18] New research seems to show that dogs have mutations to equivalent genetic regions in humans where changes are known to trigger high sociability and somewhat reduced intelligence.[19][20] Dogs vary widely in shape, size and colors.[21] Dogs perform many roles for people, such as hunting, herding, pulling loads, protection, assisting police and military, companionship and, more recently, aiding handicapped individuals and therapeutic roles.

This influence on human society has given them the sobriquet “man’s best friend”. The term “domestic dog” is generally used for both domesticated and feral varieties. The English word dog comes from Middle English dogge, from Old English docga, a “powerful dog breed”.[22] The term may possibly derive from Proto-Germanic *dukkōn, represented in Old English finger-docce (“finger-muscle”).[23] The word also shows the familiar petname diminutive -ga also seen in frogga “frog”, picga “pig”, stagga “stag”, wicga “beetle, worm”, among others.[24] Piotr Gąsiorowski has suggested that Old English *docga is actually derived from Old English colour adjective dox.

In 14th-century England, hound (from Old English: hund) was the general word for all domestic canines, and dog referred to a subtype of hound, a group including the mastiff. It is believed this “dog” type was so common, it eventually became the prototype of the category “hound”.[26] By the 16th century, dog had become the general word, and hound had begun to refer only to types used for hunting.[27] The word “hound” is ultimately derived from the Proto-Indo-European word *kwon-, “dog”.

This semantic shift may be compared with in German, where the corresponding words Dogge and Hund kept their original meanings. The term *ḱwon- may ultimately derive from the earliest layer of Proto-Indo-European vocabulary. A male canine is referred to as a “dog”, while a female is traditionally called a “bitch” (derived from Middle English bicche, from Old English bicce, ultimately from Old Norse bikkja. Since the word “bitch” has taken on derogatory connotations, nowadays it is less commonly used to refer to dogs).

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