This Is The 102nd Dalmatian

https://i2.wp.com/i.redd.it/na70ts4q7cs01.jpg?resize=701%2C1303&ssl=1

Take an inside look into the life of a man who lives as what they call a “Human Pup”. He puts on a Dalmatian dog suit and acts and lives as a dog.

VIDEO AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PAGE:

   

https://i1.wp.com/3milliondogs.com/blog-assets-two/2016/05/3490859E00000578-3604744-The_sound_and_lighting_technician_described_his_human_pup_lifest-m-11_1464091165874.jpg?resize=479%2C759&ssl=1

Animal roleplay is a form of roleplay where at least one participant plays the part of a non-human animal. As with most forms of roleplay, its uses include play and psychodrama. Animal roleplay may also be found in BDSM contexts, where an individual may take part in a dominant/submissive relationship by being treated as an animal. The activity is often referred to as petplay. However, not all types of animal roleplay within BDSM are petplay and not all petplay in BDSM involves roleplaying as an animal; some can be referred to as primal play and furry play.

   

https://i0.wp.com/www.telegraph.co.uk/content/dam/tv/2016/05/25/pups5-xlarge_trans_NvBQzQNjv4BqqVzuuqpFlyLIwiB6NTmJwfSVWeZ_vEN7c6bHu2jJnT8.jpg?w=736&ssl=1

The origins of animal roleplay and petplay are probably various and diverse, again depending upon the participants involved. However, its origins are certainly influenced by costuming, fiction, myth and legend, roleplay and psychodrama in their various aspects. Some of the earliest published images of animal play (especially pony play) are to be found in the work of John Willie, primarily in Bizarre magazine published from 1946 to 1959. Some of the equipment that can be used in animal roleplay include leash, chain, bit gag, neck collar, bondage harness, catsuit, bodystocking, butt plug, muzzle, ballet boots, etc.

https://i0.wp.com/i.pinimg.com/originals/16/cb/ea/16cbea4351a51f628fb50858f83b1523.jpg?w=736&ssl=1

Non-sexual animal roleplay was a common and integral part of ritual in many tribal cultures both in recent and likely prehistoric times, where a member (or members) of the tribe would take the role physically and often spiritually of an animal that was either revered or hunted. Examples of the former include many of the American Indian tribes and Arctic native peoples. Examples of the latter are evidenced by cave paintings. In 1911, Julia Tuell photographed the last Animal Dance (“Massaum”) performed by the Northern Cheyenne of Montana. It is also sometimes used in education, especially physical education, as a way to encourage people to exercise the body in unusual ways, by mimicking various animals.

https://i2.wp.com/cdn.itv.com/uploads/editor/medium_Ufs2YWIxLIJ_BZ8AMxjfKHCdZralOsahAuplxfgJICw.jpg?w=736&ssl=1

In manga and anime, a relatively common character type is the “catgirl”. A standard catgirl resembles a slim teenage girl with cat ears, a tail, tiny fangs and a propensity for catlike affection or curiosity. Examples include Cat Girl Nuku Nuku, Pink from Dragon Pink and Ms. Furbottom’s human form in Sgt. Frog, among others. Real-life costume play, or cosplay, of anime catgirls could be considered a form of pet play. That catgirls are humanoids with lesser attributes of felines means that the costume is an especially simple one, and therefore quite popular among convention-goers.

https://i2.wp.com/www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/2886224.main_image.jpg?resize=354%2C604&ssl=1

Though kittenlike timidity and submissiveness are prominent elements of catgirl charm, the role does not include the “heavier”, more overt kink that is usually synonymous with BDSM pet play. Some superheroes, heroines, and villains also feature elements related to pet play; such as DC Comics’s Wildcat, Catwoman, the Penguin and Vixen, Marvel’s Tigra, Man-Wolf and Black Cat, or even Nastassja Kinski’s Irena Gallier in the 1982 film Cat People (a remake of the 1942 Simone Simon film), and Miss Kitty from the Brendan Fraser movie Monkeybone. All involve animal qualities taken on by a human.

    

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.